Another Ontario Serial Embezzler

Oshawa’s Jean Hakim is at it again. She was previously nailed in 2016 for embezzling from several practices (see our story HERE.)

And now there are fresh accusations from a different practice for theft that allegedly took place from 2019-2020 in a different practice. The following is from the Toronto Sun newspaper:

A 43-year-old Oshawa woman is accused of defrauding a dental clinic where she worked out of tens of thousands of dollars.

Durham Regional Police say officers with the financial crimes unit investigated the suspected misappropriation of funds at the clinic, which allegedly spanned from January 2019 until March 2020.

“Following an audit at My Dentist My Doctor clinic, investigators received reports of an office manager who was (allegedly) taking funds that had been received from customers for her own personal benefit,” Const. Crystal Fitzgerald said Wednesday in a statement outlining the accusations.

The clinic’s losses are believed to be about $40,000.

Jean Hakim, aka Jean Persaud, is charged with fraud over $5,000, theft over $5,000, possession of property obtained by crime over $5,000, and failure to comply with a probation order.

Content retrieved from https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/oshawa-dental-clinic-office-manager-accused-of-40000-fraud


This story is a good reminder of the need to do proper background investigation (including a criminal records check) before hiring. Check out our webinar on forensic hiring for some good tips.

Forensic Hiring Webinar

24 Months for Serial Embezzler who Stole From Dentist and then Mayor

blank

Roslyn Wedington, 51, was sentenced to two years in prison for tax fraud in connection with her work at the Maryland Center for Adult Training.

She asked for leniency, saying that she cheated on her taxes because she was overwhelmed by student loans and medical bills and trying to help friends and family. If spared prison time, she said, she could pay back her debt to society.

But federal prosecutors, calling her a “rare fraud recidivist,” noted that she had embezzled $800,000 from a previous job and made little effort to make restitution.

U.S. District Judge Deborah Chasanow noted Wedington’s ability to help people, but said that she had twice taken advantage of a position of authority.

“You have proven you cannot be trusted,” Chasanow said. “Frankly, I have no trouble imposing 24 months.”

Wedington was director of the Maryland Center for Adult Training, where Pugh served on the board of directors. Disgraced for Baltimore mayor Catherine Pugh’s aide Gary Brown helped Wedington earn an off-the-books salary so she could avoid paying taxes and wage garnishment for years. She managed to avoid paying $120,000 to the government during that time.

Brown was sentenced to 27 months in federal prison for his role in the MCAT scheme, as well as a fraud scheme related to Pugh’s Healthy Holly children’s books. Pugh, meanwhile, is serving a three-year sentence in an Alabama federal prison.

Wedington was convicted in 2004 for stealing $852,000 from a beloved Park Heights dentist while working as his secretary. She presented checks to Dr. Ernest Colvin to sign, then would add a thousand dollars to the amount. Colvin, who has since died, asked at the time for leniency for Wedington, and she was spared jail and asked to pay back $250,000. She made sporadic payments.

Part of Wedington’s salary from MCAT was garnished in 2013 to repay debts. To avoid such garnishments moving forward, she asked Brown to move her “off payroll” at MCAT and instead funnel money directly to her.

According to Wedington’s plea agreement, Brown directed the center’s payroll provider to pay him the amount of her salary — more than $80,000 a year — as an independent contractor. He then gave the money to Wedington in cash. Brown eventually gained authority to write checks from MCAT bank accounts, and started writing Wedington checks directly.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Leo Wise told Chasanow that “fraud was how [Wedington] operated. That’s simply the state of affairs for her.”

Wedington’s attorney, Brandon Mead, said that his client hadn’t splurged on handbags and fancy cars, but was trying to get by.

“Ms. Wedington is one of those individuals who takes on a lot,” Mead told Chasanow.

Wedington apologized, but also blamed others.

That didn’t sit well with Chasanow.

“The fraud in this case was your instigation,” Chasanow said. “You didn’t want to pay taxes, you wanted to have money yourself. There might’ve been good things you did with it. That’s not the point.”

Content retrieved from: https://www.baltimoresun.com/news/crime/bs-md-ci-cr-pugh-wedington-sentencing-20210304-euyub2njczcpfnpshykzvdr7bm-story.html

Oregon Woman Convicted for Stealing From Dental and Medical Clinics

blank
Anndrea Jacobs

To watch a webinar on how to prevent people with “baggage” from getting jobs in your practice, click on the button below.

Forensic Hiring Webinar

Update Jan 11, 2021

Last week a federal judge sentenced Ms. Jacobs to four years in prison and orderd restitution of $1.2 million.

Ms. Jacobs has been in custody since August after violating her release conditions.


May 28, 2020, an Oregon woman, Anndrea D. Jacobs, age 49, turned herself into the U.S. Marshals Service on an outstanding warrant for bank fraud. The FBI obtained the underlying criminal complaint, alleging that Jacobs stole checks payable to a Hood River, Oregon, dental practice worth more than $22,000 between August and October 2019. Jacobs worked as a contractor for the clinic until her termination in May 2020. The FBI and IRS-Criminal Investigation Division agents are working this case jointly.

She made her initial appearance today, May 28, 2020, on these charges before U.S. Magistrate Judge John V. Acosta in the U.S. District Court in Portland. The judge ordered that Jacobs be detained pending a continued hearing on the government’s motion to revoke her pretrial release in an older case against her.

Jacobs is already scheduled to go to trial in August 2020 on a separate indictment charging her with similar behavior at a medical practice in La Grande. The 2018 indictment spells out 15 charges, including: four counts of wire fraud, five counts of filing false income tax returns, four counts of aiding and assisting in the filing of false income tax returns, one count of false impersonation of a U.S. Government employee, and one count of aggravated identity theft.

Have questions or concerns? Call us toll-free at 888-398-2327 or click the button below.

Contact Us

Content retrieved from: https://www.fbi.gov/contact-us/field-offices/portland/news/press-releases/oregon-woman-faces-federal-charges-for-allegedly-stealing-funds-from-dental-clinic

Florida’s Camille Garza has Embezzlement Convictions

blank
Camille Garza

To watch a webinar on how to prevent people with “baggage” from getting jobs in your practice, click on the button below.

Forensic Hiring Webinar

While Camille Martinez Garza (born October 25, 1983) of Sunshine, FL, looks like she is having fun in this photo, she was probably having less fun when she was convicted of Grand Theft, Fraud, Organized Fraud of between $20,000 and $50,000 and a probation violation. She was sentenced to a year in prison plus ten years of probation.

These charges originated from her work in two Florida dental offices, and she is reported to still be working in the dental field.

She also has a long list of traffic violations, and your overall impression is that this is someone without much respect for society’s rules.

Ms. Garza personifies the need to conduct criminal records checks before hiring.

Here is one of her mug shots:

blank

Have questions or concerns? Call us toll-free at 888-398-2327 or click the button below.

Contact Us

Wow — Albany NY Dentist Sues, Accusing Ex-nun of Bilking Him out of Nearly $1M

ALBANY – A former nun, who nearly 30 years ago was found to have defrauded a group of anesthesiologists, is being accused of draining nearly $1 million from an Albany dentist’s bank accounts.
Dr. James McMahon Jr., who operates McMahon Family Dentistry and J. McMahon Properties, LLC, filed the civil lawsuit Sept. 20, accusing Mary Ann Fuina, 80, of making 37 unauthorized withdrawals from his accounts, totaling $961,000, and using shell companies to hide the withdrawals from McMahon.
The lawsuit also names Fuina’s bookkeeping firm, Billing Electronic Systems Technology, of Colonie, Christine Mosher, an employee at the firm,

blank
Christine Mosher, one of the defendants

Barbara O’Brien, the CEO of NorthEast IT Group, and Scott, Stackrow & Co., a Troy accounting firm that both McMahon and Fuina used.
The withdrawals went to cover unspecified personal and business expenses for Fuina, according to the lawsuit.
McMahon and his attorney, Donald Hillmann, declined to comment earlier this week.
Phone numbers associated with Fuina were disconnected; a message to Billing Electronic Systems Technology was not returned. O’Brien and Mosher could not be reached for comment. No one answered the door at an Albany house that records suggest is Fuina’s home.
A representative from Scott, Stackrow & Co., did not return a message asking for comment.
In 1991, a federal jury found in a civil lawsuit that Fuina, a former Sister of Mercy, defrauded Capital District Professional Management Systems by using company assets for her own benefit and made unauthorized credit-card purchases and took loans. The group sued Fuina in 1989 under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act of 1970, a law originally enacted to combat organized crime.
According to Times Union archives, Fuina worked for Professional Management Systems, a medical billing company set up by the anesthesiologists, for 16 years before resigning in June 1989 to form a rival company, Billing Electronic Systems Technology.
The jury awarded the group $750,000 in damages but did not find that Fuina violated the RICO Act. It does not appear that Fuina was ever criminally charged in that case.
At that time, Fuina was also sued in state Supreme Court for shifting $200,000 in corporate funds into her own bank account and criminal theft of trade secrets when she set up her bookkeeping company before resigning from Professional Management Systems, according to Times Union archives. That lawsuit also named Barbara O’Brien, who left the billing group to go work with Fuina. The results of that lawsuit were not immediately available.
The federal lawsuit alleged that while Fuina worked with Professional Management Services she ran up company debt to embezzle at least $60,000; submitted loan applications with fake signatures of company officers; charged to the firm thousands of dollars of personal purchases, including dog biscuits, bedsheets, a videocassette recorder and bicycle rack; billed the company for $5,510 worth of landscaping at her home; and sold to St. Peter’s Hospital for $19,330 part of the company’s leased telephone system.
It also alleges that Fuina diverted $15,500 through a company called Showcase Construction to one of the three employees who resigned with her and had the company pay about $30,000 to a firm she owned and operated, Management Advice Financial Planning, for work that was never done.
That firm, which was dissolved in 1990, played a key role in the new allegations, which lay out a simpler scheme.
Beginning in early 2017, Fuina allegedly made periodic withdrawals from McMahon’s accounts, typically by taking money from the dentistry’s account or line of credit, moving it to the property LLC and then writing herself a check or writing checks to Management Advice & Future Planning, according to the lawsuit. The LLC later received a check from Management Advice Financial Planning, the firm that Fuina dissolved in 1990.
According to the lawsuit and public records, O’Brien and Fuina are involved in each other’s businesses. The lawsuit claims, but does not exactly say how, that O’Brien either knew of the withdrawals or assisted with them.
McMahon hired Fuina and the other defendants in September 2006 to provide services for the dentistry practice he took over from his father, as well for his personal and business accounts. And McMahon appeared to have no cause for complaint until early 2019 when M&T Bank alerted him about several large withdrawals from his accounts. It was unclear why the bank did not alert him of the withdrawals for nearly two years.
Fuina allegedly made the first withdrawal on Jan. 4, 2017, taking $18,000 from one of McMahon’s accounts, according to a schedule of the alleged withdrawals filed with the lawsuit.
Another $18,000 was withdrawn a month later, followed by $45,000 on Feb. 6, 2017, according to the withdrawal scheduled filed with the lawsuit.
The withdrawals continued, with at least one a month through the end of the year. In August 2017 alone, Fuina allegedly withdrew a combined $101,000 from McMahon’s accounts.
The schedule filed with the lawsuit indicates she made at least some attempts at replenishing the funds. Over a three-day period at the end of December 2017 $200,000 was put back into McMahon’s accounts.
Five days later, Fuina allegedly made another $20,000 withdrawal.
The complaint also alleges that Fuina overcharged McMahon $20,000 for her services and assumed responsibility a $100,000 loan McMahon made to her sister.
Fuina allegedly used the funds for her personal use but the lawsuit does not specify what McMahon believes she spent the money on.
When McMahon confronted her about the missing money, Fuina was evasive and McMahon didn’t learn the full extent of his losses until May 2019, according to the complaint. McMahon said Fuina admitted to taking the money and proposed a restitution plan but also claimed that the money was a loan that she had always intended to repay.
In the complaint, McMahon’s attorney argues that Mosher, one of the Fuina’s employees who had access to McMahon’s check signature stamp, O’Brien, and the accounting firm all either had knowledge of the alleged thefts or should have realized what was going on. The lawsuit alleges, relying on the IP address, that Mosher’s computer was the one used to transfer funds. It does not allege that Mosher directly transferred the funds or received any of the money personally.
It also alleges that since the Scott, Stackrow firm was the accountant for McMahon and Fuina, the firm should have realized that the large, periodic withdrawals were improper and violated the firm’s fiduciary duties.
McMahon is asking for damages, interest and attorney’s fees. None of the plaintiffs filed a reply to the complaint as of Wednesday afternoon.

Have questions or concerns? Call us toll-free at 888-398-2327 or click the button below.

Contact Us

Content retrieved from https://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Dentist-files-lawsuit-alleging-near-1-million-14464901.php

Hiring Alert — Illinois

To watch a webinar on how to prevent people with “baggage” from getting jobs in your practice, click on the button below.

Forensic Hiring Webinar

This woman, who now goes by the name Courtney Lynn Smith, of Yorkville IL, has an extensive criminal record including both forgery and perjury.

blank
Courtney Lynn Smith

She previously used the name Courtney DeWitt.

She is reported to have worked at several dental practices in the Chicagoland area, and there are some reports of missing money.

Here is a mugshot of Courtney. Please be sure to follow proper screening procedures before hiring an employee. Please see https://www.prosperident.com/how-not-to-hire-the-wrong-people-in-your-practice/ for some tips on how to check the background of an applicant properly.

blank

Have questions or concerns? Call us toll-free at 888-398-2327 or click the button below.

Contact Us

Case OverviewCase TitleDEWITT COURTNEY LCharge (First)FORGERY/ISSUE/DELIVER DOCUMENT

Case #2018CF000415NameDEWITT COURTNEY LCase TypeCriminal FelonyJudgeHON JODY GLEASONCourtRoomROOM 114AAddress807 W JOHNYORKVILLE, IL 60560Show MapStatusPre-trial

Amount OwedParticipant TypeDefendant$.00Next/Last Court Date08/27/2019 at 1:00 PM

How to Read a Resume Critically

It continues to amaze us that the people who we refer to as “serial embezzlers” continue to find jobs in dental practices. One skill that dentists, and others involved in the hiring process, seem to lack is the ability to read resumes critically.

Here is the 2019 resume of one serial embezzler. She has used different names at various times including Unique Wells and Unique Edmond. She has a lengthy criminal record, and her own page in our Hall of Shame — https://www.prosperident.com/hiring-alert-nevada/.

Click the button below to have a look at her resume.

So let’s take a forensic look at her resume and the attached reference letter. A few things pop out:

  1. Work experience on the resume is limited to two corporately-owned dental practices. Many practice owners do not bother checking references, and thieves know that there is a bit more work involved in obtaining a reference from a large organization like a university or DSO than a solo practice. Embezzlers know that listing large organizations is enough to deter prospective employers from reference checking.
  2. Her statement that she is willing to relocate for a job anywhere in the US is a bit overeager for the dental office manager or financial coordinator jobs for which she is applying.
  3. The “some college” she has listed for education is concerningly vague. Most employers would expect to see which college, years attended, program studied, etc. on a resume. It looks like Unique is trying hard to give as little past information as possible.
  4. On the subject of vagueness, Unique lists no home address for herself.
  5. Of course, she is not specific about which Henderson, NV Pacific Dental office she works in. There are actually four offices. She would not want you to call that office only to find out that she does not work there.
  6. We tell practice owners to place no value whatsoever in written job references because they are easy to forge. There are several clues that this reference letter is not real.
  7. The reference letter is not on letterhead. Even if it were, that would provide no validation; letterhead is easy to forge. However, the fact that this letter is not on letterhead, and is signed using a “script” font from a word processor, creates strong questions about its credibility.
  8. Google searching suggests that the consultant, Kara Stevenson, and her company, do not exist.
  9. The phone number listed for Kara Stevenson was answered by Unique when we called.
  10. When reading the reference letter, one should be wondering in what context a consultant would be in a position to observe Unique’s work when her experience is limited to two DSOs. Most DSOs do not employ in-office consultants.
  11. The lavish praise heaped on Unique seem inconsistent with the insurance coordinator position that she claims to have held for the past nine years. According to the consultant, Unique pretty much walks on water. If she really had the attributes “like an in-house consultant,” “110% loyalty,” and an “ownership mentality,” and was working for a DSO, and was willing to relocate, Pacific Dental Services (with over 700 offices, and growing by 80 per year) would have certainly promoted her by now, probably more than once.

We recently were provided with another resume that was used by someone using the name Marie Edmond. You may notice that the phone number, and much of the text is identical to that used by Unique. Click the button below for a look.

Hiring is a challenging process. It is difficult to find the right person, particularly in a booming economy with a labor shortage. In this all-consuming process, it is easy to lose the skepticism that needs to be there. To make a clumsy pun, Unique is not unique. Many resumes have false, misleading, or incomplete information. Many applicants have attributes that they want to hide from you. We can never forget to question the completeness, internal consistency, and reasonableness of a resume.

To watch a webinar on how to prevent people with “baggage” from getting jobs in your practice, click on the button below.

Forensic Hiring Webinar

Look out for This Person!

blank

To watch a webinar on how to prevent people with “baggage” from getting jobs in your practice, click on the button below.

Forensic Hiring Webinar

Alexandra Counts-Thompson’s lengthy rap sheet has over 30 convictions, including several for embezzlement. Most convictions are from North Carolina and Virginia.

She is known to work in dental practices.

She uses several variants of her name including:

  • Alexandra Counts Thompson
  • Alexandra Nikole Counts
  • Alexandra N Counts
  • Alexandra Nicole Counts
  • Alexandra Nikol Thompson

We would urge extreme caution in dealing with this person.


Have questions or concerns? Call us toll-free at 888-398-2327 or click the button below.

Contact Us

Why Caution Is Needed When Checking References

Reference Check Essentials: Helping You Master Your Hiring Process

We recently received the following email from a dentist:

“My embezzler passed my references check. I asked for six references, and she passed with flying colors. And then proceeded to rob me blind. I thought that maybe y’all needed to make a post about it, or SOMETHING, to the world of dentistry, because seriously, this is why we can’t trust references. When people fabricate deception like this, how can we trust anything as employers, to be able to find someone worthy of hiring?”

The dentist was referring to a website that, for a fee, will supply false references to help someone pass reference checks. Here is what one such site claims:

“Paladin Deception Services is here to assist you in obtaining the fictitious reference, the little white lie, or the alibi that you need. Our agency can provide you with either male or female testimonials over the phone in the local area code that you require. We’re confidential, professional, innovative, and affordable. Most importantly, we keep it legal. Get the verification that you need!”

People with tainted pasts are aware that dental offices are great places to seek jobs because background checking done by most offices is superficial and easily defeated.

Here is what one (illiterate) convicted felon said about working in dental offices:
“Dental game is great. No back round checks unless u work with kids. Great money easy hrs and its the same thing over and over.”

We’d like to mention two sobering statistics about the people who apply for jobs with you: one in four US adults has a criminal record, and some studies suggest that the prevalence of resume falsification or enhancement exceeds 50%.

To help you avoid a hiring mistake similar to that of the dentist who emailed me, here are some essential steps to follow when checking references:

1. Check photo identification (and some other institutionally issued card or ID) for every applicant you interview. One of the easiest ways to hide an unsavory past is to use someone else’s name.

2. You must speak with all former employers for the past five years. There is no value whatsoever to “character” references; the only people you want to speak with are former employers. What someone’s 8th-grade science teacher thinks about them isn’t of much value.

3. Have a conversation with every single work reference listed for the past five years. Written reference letters, even if addressed personally to you, are worthless. Many people leaving a workplace “borrow” a supply of letterhead and envelopes so they can forge reference letters as needed. One study found that 17% of the employers surveyed had detected forged reference letters. You need to pick up the phone and call. No exceptions.

4. On the subject of calling, never call any phone number given to you by an applicant. You may end up speaking with a relative or friend pretending to be a former employer or a “deception” service like the one described earlier. Find phone numbers independently, and call those numbers to ensure you are speaking to the correct former employer.

5. Ensure that the office you are calling is a real business. If it is a dental office, the dentist will be registered with their State Board. Another place you can check is www.ratemds.com, which has patient reviews for virtually every dental practice. If the work experience was with a non-dental business, do they have a website? Another good place to check for legitimacy is Equifax, which maintains listings on almost every legitimate company. (https://sb.econsumer.equifax.com/bizdirect/companySearch.ehtml?advancedSearch=true).

6. When you call the office of a former employer, make sure you speak to the right person. If you are calling a dental office, speak to the practice owner first. He or she may hand you off to their office manager but start with the dentist. For any non-dental small business, identify and speak to the owner. Larger companies typically have HR departments that provide job reference information. Often, calling an HR department means that the information you obtain is limited, and you will probably not have the benefit of speaking with anybody who supervised your applicant, but make the call nonetheless.

7. You should ask the following questions to every former employer you speak with:
a. What were the start date and end date of employment? Please ask the former employer for these dates; do not provide them and ask for confirmation. Applicants trying to hide something will often manipulate employment dates.
b. Confirm job title for the position(s) held by the applicant. Job applicants often embellish their resumes so that, even though their former position was “receptionist,” on their resume it becomes “office manager.”
c. Ask each former employer who the applicant worked for previously and subsequently. Often former employers do not know this information, but sometimes they do. Comparing what you learn with the resume provided may uncover a discrepancy.
d. Ask who ended the employment relationship. This question may not be one that gets answered, but you may learn something valuable if it is.
e. You should always ask whether the organization or individual you are calling would re-hire the applicant. If you are speaking with an HR department, you may get better results if you ask the question in the negative, i.e., “Is there any reason why this person is not eligible to be rehired by you?”.

8. You must get a reference from an applicant’s current or most recent employer. Often an applicant will ask you not to contact their current employer because “he/she does not know that I am leaving”. This statement may be true, but alternatively, this may be a strategy to prevent you from calling a “current” employer only to find out that your applicant was fired from their employ two weeks ago. An applicant who asks you not to contact their current employer must be told that you do not hire anyone without speaking with their most recent employer. You may offer to defer this conversation, but you must make it clear that a discussion with their current employer must take place before you finalize an offer of employment.

While most applicants for the vacancy you need to fill are honest and will make excellent employees, there are those who need to be filtered out.

We see “serial embezzlers” all too frequently, and many of them would not have secured employment with the practices they stole from if those offices had known about and implemented the hiring strategies we have outlined here. Historically low unemployment rates and the perception that there is a shortage of qualified applicants for positions in dental offices put a great deal of pressure on practice owners to rush the hiring process. I would like to urge you to resist the temptation to expedite your hiring process. The cost of hiring a rotten apple far exceeds the value of conducting a proper screening.

To watch a webinar on how to prevent people with “baggage” from getting jobs in your practice, click on the button below.

Forensic Hiring Webinar

A repeat offender receives 21-month jail sentence

blank

We previously wrote about Jill D’Angelo, who embezzled more than $475,000, HERE.

However, it appears that not everybody looks at our Hall of Shame, because after spending 41 months in prison, Jill has been at it again.  Here is a recent news article showing what Jill has been up to.  She has now joined an exclusive fraternity known as the Half Million Dollar Club.


Have questions or concerns? Call us toll-free at 888-398-2327 or click the button below.

Contact Us


To watch a webinar on how to prevent people with “baggage” from getting jobs in your practice, click on the button below.

Forensic Hiring Webinar


 

Former dental clinic manager gets fed prison in second embezzlement case

A federal judge on Thursday told Jill Bowser that her drug addiction does not excuse her “outrageous conduct” of embezzlement and forging prescriptions and sent her away for 21 months.

U.S. District Judge Cathy Bissoon also tacked on another 10 months for violating probation in a previous embezzlement case.

Bowser is a former dental office manager from West Mifflin.

Twice she has victimized employers who trusted her.

She went to prison the first time, got out, got a new job under a different name and then did the same thing.

Her previous victim, Marjorie Leof, a Pleasant Hills dentist, took the stand and said Ms. Bowser has no respect for the law and doesn’t care about the pain she causes.

“Her narcissism won’t allow it,” she said.

Bowser, 51, pleaded guilty in August to embezzlement and narcotics charges. She stole $87,000 from Steel City Dental Associates in Turtle Creek. She also forged prescriptions for narcotic painkillers so she could sell them.

Bowser and her public defender, Sarah Levin, had hoped for probation and a treatment program to help her deal with a decade-long addiction to narcotics.

Prosecutors wanted jail time.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Shaun Sweeney said that when Bowser was convicted of the same crimes in 2012, she told a judge that she would “never again commit such a stupid, irresponsible and dishonest act.”

Then she did exactly that.

After she was hired at SCDA using a different name, Mr. Sweeney said, she forged and mailed an employment verification form on SCDA letterhead to her probation officer. The letter, purportedly from the owner of the practice, said Bowser was working there, deceiving the probation officer into believing that SCDA knew about her past and hired her anyway.

Bowser used her maiden name and not her married name, Jill D’Angelo, which she had used in the previous case.

Mr. Sweeney said prison is the only way to stop her.

“She undoubtedly would have continued to forge and embezzle for as long as she could get away with it,” he said. “Fortunately, however, the USPO and the FBI were able to put a stop to the defendant’s criminal activity before the defendant completely destroyed SCDA and caused more losses to the insurers.”

The judge agreed and U.S. marshals led Bowser away.

She initially came to the attention of the FBI last year when federal probation officers said they thought she was forging prescriptions again.

She had previously been the officer manager at Dr. Leof’s practice. She forged prescriptions under various dentists’ names to obtain more than 100 scripts for painkillers in her name or the names of relatives, according to the FBI.

Agents also found that she was diverting checks from insurance companies that were supposed to go to the practice’s bank account.

The FBI said she diverted 129 checks and stole $475,000 in all.

She was released from prison in 2016 and was still on probation when SCDA hired her, not realizing who she was.

Content retrieved from https://www.post-gazette.com/news/crime-courts/2018/12/06/Dental-clinic-manager-Jill-Bowser-federal-prison-second-embezzlement-case/stories/201812060141