Virginia dental worker guilty of fraudulently distributing 100,000+ hydrocodone pills

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. – A Yorktown woman was found guilty Tuesday on charges related to  fraudulently obtaining over 100,000 hydrocodone pills.

According to court records and evidence presented at trial, 54-year-old Donna Byrd Talley worked as a long-time office manager for Hampton dentist Dr. Steven Becker.

Talley had control over Dr. Becker’s bank accounts and was responsible for all office administration.

From 2002 through 2011, Talley used Dr. Becker’s DEA license to fraudulently obtain over 100,000 pills of hydrocodone from two dental supply companies.

She then distributed the hydrocodone to her husband and others and used it to feed her own addiction.

In 2011, Talley made various cash deposits to bank accounts she owned or controlled in amounts over $7,000.

On Aug. 18, 2011, investigators with the Virginia Department of Health Professions and the Virginia State Police interviewed Talley, who admitted to ordering hydrocodone. Later that same day, an investigator recovered a pill bottle containing hydrocodone from Talley’s residence, matching shipments of hydrocodone ordered by Talley and received by Dr. Becker’s office two days earlier.

Talley was convicted by a federal jury on charges of acquiring or obtaining a controlled substance, possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance, and mail fraud.

She faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison when sentenced on Feb. 22, 2017.

Do you have questions about embezzlement?  Give Prosperident a call at 888-398-2327 or send an email to requests@dentalembezzlement.com

Content retrieved from: http://wtkr.com/2016/11/09/hampton-dental-worker-guilty-of-fraudulently-distributing-100000-hydrocodone-pills/

Virginia Woman Charged for Embezzling Thousands from Employers

jennifertomlin

A woman is facing an embezzlement charge for allegedly stealing thousands of dollars from two employers.

The Augusta County Sheriff’s Office investigated 39-year-old Jennifer Tomlin after her employer, an unidentified dentist’s office near Waynesboro, reported she had opened a business credit card without the employer’s permission.

On investigating, deputies say they found evidence she had done the same thing at a previous employer.

She is charged with using company credit cards to make personal purchases and pay bills.

She is accused of taking about $20,000 combined from both employers.

Investigators think the embezzlement occurred for several years.

Do you have questions about embezzlement?  Give Prosperident a call at 888-398-2327 or send an email to requests@dentalembezzlement.com

Content retrieved from: http://www.whsv.com/home/headlines/Woman_Charged_for_Embezzling_Thousands_from_Employers_117433838.html

Virginia woman has three embezzlement charges dropped; charged with a fourth in a different jurisdiction

Do you have questions about embezzlement?  Give Prosperident a call at 888-398-2327 or send an email to requests@dentalembezzlement.com

mimi-diaz-torres

Meet Mimi Diaz Torres.   She has an interesting work history.  Here is part of her resume:

 

Fairfax County Arrest Records:

DIAZ TORRES MIMI 22 01/05/2014 18.2-96(2) PETIT LARCENY: <$200 NOT FROM A PERSON 8517 CHIPPEWA, LORTON, VA 22079
DIAZ TORRES MIMI 22 12/31/2013 18.2-111 EMBEZZLEMENT: >=$200 8517 CHIPPEWA, LORTON, VA 22079
DIAZ TORRES MIMI 22 12/31/2013 18.2-172 OTHER FORGERY WRITING:NOT IN 18.2-168 & 18.2-170 8517 CHIPPEWA, LORTON, VA 22079
DIAZ TORRES MIMI 22 12/31/2013 18.2-172 OTHER FORGERY WRITING:NOT IN 18.2-168 & 18.2-170 8517 CHIPPEWA, LORTON, VA 22079
TORRES MIMI DIAZ 22 03/22/2013 82-1-6[46.2-301] LIC REVOKED: DR W/O LICENSE, 1 OFF 1292 BAYSIDE AVE, 13, WOODBRIDGE, VA 22191

Here are some pieces of her resume:

mimi-diaz-resume-2

mimi-diaz-resume-1

And here is her release report from when she was granted bail in Prince William County:

mimi-diaz-arrest

 

Virginia office manager steals — has done it before

JenniferTomlin

A woman is facing an embezzlement charge for allegedly stealing thousands of dollars from two employers.

The Augusta County Sheriff’s Office investigated 39-year-old Jennifer Tomlin after her employer, an unidentified dentist’s office near Waynesboro, reported she had opened a business credit card without the employer’s permission.

On investigating, deputies say they found evidence she had done the same thing at a previous employer.

She is charged with using company credit cards to make personal purchases and pay bills.

She is accused of taking about $20,000 combined from both employers.

Investigators think the embezzlement occurred for several years.


Do you have questions about embezzlement?  Give Prosperident a call at 888-398-2327 or send an email to requests@dentalembezzlement.com

Content retrieved from: http://www.whsv.com/home/headlines/Woman_Charged_for_Embezzling_Thousands_from_Employers_117433838.html

Virginia embezzler goes undetected for 10 years; steals $350k

rosalind deborah wright

A once-trusted employee who stole more than $350,000 from her employer was ordered yesterday to serve 18 months in prison.

Rosalind Deborah Wright, 50, stole the money from dentist Alexander Balian’s office over a 10-year period starting in 1998, court records state.

She pleaded guilty in June to six counts of embezzlement. Five other charges were dropped.

Yesterday, Judge David Beck sentenced Wright to a total of 60 years in prison with all but 18 months suspended. Wright had no previous criminal record.

According to court records, Balian hired Wright as his office manager in 1998. She soon began taking checks from insurance companies and signing them over to herself with Balian’s signature stamp. She then put the money in her private account.

Court records say Wright stole thousands of dollars every year and pocketed nearly $48,000 in 2002.

Terese Hill, who worked in the office with Wright for about five years, was the first to notice a discrepancy and later turned over evidence of Wright’s embezzling.

Wright quickly admitted to stealing when confronted by a Spotsylvania detective.

Also yesterday, a plan for Wright to repay $350,000 was finalized.

She paid $175,000 to Balian yesterday, according to the agreement. That money came from the sale of a riverfront summer home Wright and her husband owned.

She is also scheduled to pay another $25,000 in cash on Dec. 10.

The rest of the debt will be paid through the transfer of two timeshares to Balian and from monthly $500 payments Wright must make or risk losing her primary residence.


Do you have questions about embezzlement?  Give Prosperident a call at 888-398-2327 or send an email to requests@dentalembezzlement.com

Content retrieved from: http://www.fredericksburg.com/local/embezzler-sentenced-to-prison/article_0bd86ff2-26a9-594c-9d4b-8f43e8c52c6c.html

Virginia woman guilty in embezzlement case

 

elizabeth shaver

 

STAUNTON – A Swoope woman accused of bilking a local pediatric dentist of more than $8,000 has been convicted on five misdemeanor charges of embezzlement, dodging several felony charges in the process, court records show.

However, the defendant couldn’t dodge a short stint in jail.

Elizabeth V. Shaver, 35, used her former employer’s credit card to make $8,206 in illegal purchases, according to the Augusta County Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office.

Shaver was working for Dr. Brian T. Brumbraugh in Staunton when she began using the credit card, the prosecutor’s office said. The purchases began in 2012, according to Shaver’s indictments, and continued for about two years.

In all, Shaver was given five years in prison with all but 14 days suspended. Shaver will report to jail after the holidays on Jan. 4, and court records indicate she will be allowed to serve her sentence on the weekends.

An Augusta County grand jury initially indicted Shaver in April on six felony charges of embezzlement.

Shaver entered Alford pleas to the amended charges last week, admitting no guilt but acknowledging there was enough evidence against her for a conviction.


Do you have questions about embezzlement?  Give Prosperident a call at 888-398-2327 or send an email to requests@dentalembezzlement.com

Content retrieved from: http://www.newsleader.com/story/news/local/2015/11/10/shaver-embezzlement-augusta-county/75524588/

________________

A 2011 divorce seems to have contributed to Ms. Shaver’s financial woes — she declared bankruptcy in 2014

[pdf-embedder url=”https://www.prosperident.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Shaver-8.5.14.pdf” title=”Shaver 8.5.14″]

Virginia dentist’s friend sentenced to 3 years; embezzled $422k

Longtime Richmond dentist Edward D. Gardner Jr. trusted his close friend and business partner, David B. Kagey, “as much as I trusted anybody.”

“I thought he was my best friend,” Gardner testified Thursday in Chesterfield County Circuit Court. “I loved him like a brother. I trusted him implicitly.”

The two men and their wives traveled and took vacations together as their business relationship evolved over a decade. Their bonds of friendship seemed only to grow as Gardner hired Kagey to oversee his successful dental practice on Forest Hill Avenue and then help develop a lucrative side business that brought them additional financial rewards.

To Gardner, it now seems largely a mirage.

For at least five years, Kagey methodically and with no apparent regret stole hundreds of thousands of dollars from his best friend and confidant until Gardner’s practice nearly collapsed. Employees’ salaries had to be cut, along with the number of days the practice could operate. Three of the four dentists were let go, leaving only Gardner.

In a bit of irony, the ongoing theft forced Gardner to lay off even Kagey — a decision that Gardner said he deeply regretted at the time.

“It seemed that we should have been doing better than we were,” Gardner testified. “But we seemed to be falling further and further behind in paying our bills.”

Before Gardner and his daughter discovered the theft, Kagey had siphoned off at least $422,000 between Jan. 1, 2006, and Dec. 31, 2010. A forensic accountant hired by Gardner believes the loss totaled as much as $750,000.

Kagey’s “lies, deceit and longtime betrayal” — as Chesterfield prosecutor Larry S. Hogan described it — culminated Thursday in a three-year prison term for Kagey.

Judge Harold W. Burgess Jr. sentenced Kagey, 57, to a total of 40 years in prison with 37 years suspended on four felony counts of embezzlement, to which Kagey had pleaded guilty in September. At Hogan’s urging, Burgess deviated up from state sentencing guidelines, which called for probation and no incarceration — largely because Kagey had no criminal record.

The theft, Burgess said, “represents a continuous pattern of deceit” that was made worse by the “unusually close relationship” between Kagey and his victim.

But the judge did give Kagey credit for living a law-abiding life tarnished by one mistake, and successfully raising two children with his wife of 30 years. At one point, all of them stood in support of him. “It’s sad to see a man like you before me,” the judge said.

The judge ordered Kagey to pay $439,191.89 in restitution to Gardner, which includes about $16,000 Gardner collectively paid to his daughter and the forensic accountant to unravel the theft. When Kagey is released at age 60, he must repay a minimum of $1,000 a month.

Aside from the theft, Kagey “has had an otherwise exemplary life,” defense attorney G. Manoli Loupassi said, and has at all times admitted to his “guilt, his embarrassment and his shame.”

The attorney explained Kagey’s thievery as “stealing to pay” for a lifestyle that was beyond his middle-class means, and “trying to be something he’s not.”

But Hogan described Kagey as a callously deceptive man who “fidgeted like a 3-year-old” when caught in lies during questioning by a Chesterfield detective. When Gardner’s dental practice was on the verge of insolvency, Hogan noted, Kagey admonished employees to cut back on basic supplies — while he used stolen funds to play country club-level golf and spend $17,000 at Paper Moon, a topless club in South Richmond.

Hogan said Kagey had none of the usual vices — gambling, alcohol or drugs — that would explain why he stole such vast sums. “It was all spent frivolously,” the prosecutor said.


Do you have questions about embezzlement?  Give Prosperident a call at 888-398-2327 or send an email to requests@dentalembezzlement.com

Content retrieved from: http://www.richmond.com/news/article_e7280e55-ffb1-5cef-8524-860d69416120.html

Virginia woman Admits to Stealing More Than $100,000 from Employer

BRAITHWAITEHARRISONBURG, Va. (WHSV) A former city dental office employee accused of stealing roughly $130,000 from her employer pleaded guilty on Thursday.

New Market resident Jeannie Braithwaite pleaded guilty to two counts of embezzlement.

A judge sentenced her to an 8-year suspended prison sentence and ordered her to pay restitution.

Prosecutors say she stole money from Dr. Anna-Marie Boggs’ office, where she worked as a receptionist.

The defendant worked at the office for roughly two decades.


Do you have questions about embezzlement?  Give Prosperident a call at 888-398-2327 or send an email to requests@dentalembezzlement.com

Content retrieved from: New Market Woman Admits to Stealing More Than $100,000 from Employer

Four years in prison, restitution agreed upon in Virginia dental assistant embezzlement case

It is still unclear exactly how much money a southwest Roanoke dental assistant was able to steal from her boss over time — estimates range from $20,000 to $120,000 — but on Friday it was determined she would agree to pay $60,000 in restitution for her crimes and serve four years in prison.

Connie Meredith Saunders, 57, was arrested just over two years ago and pleaded guilty in January 2013 to five counts of embezzlement, one count of forgery and one count of uttering or passing forged currency.

Saunders worked for years at Merritt Dental on Brambleton Avenue, and at her plea hearing Roanoke Deputy Commonwealth’s Attorney Betty Jo Anthony said Saunders had, in 2008, started skimming cash when she made bank deposits for the office. Those thefts continued until they were finally discovered in September 2011, at which point Saunders claimed to have no accurate count of how much she’d embezzled, though she did admit to having forged an office check for $1,025.

“She took advantage of her employer,” Anthony told the court. “She’s wrecked Dr. Merritt’s business.”

Judge Charlie Dorsey sentenced Saunders to two years on each of the seven counts against her, suspending that time after she serves four years and also ordered her to spend five years on probation.

The possible range of the total stolen spanned $100,000, with Saunders maintaining it was lower and the victim, Pamela Merritt, claiming it was higher. But faced with the risk of further litigation, both sides opted to roughly split the difference and settle on $60,000 as the amount.

Saunders acknowledged to Anthony that since her arrest, she had worked only intermittently and had not set any money aside to cover her debt to Merritt, but she argued that she had lately been limited by a variety of health problems and had been hospitalized for ailments including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, lower back pain, a torn rotator cuff and spider bites.

She said she had applied for disability and hoped to use that money to make Merritt whole.

Dorsey took issue with Saunders and the crimes, arguing that because of the small size of the business “there is a greater degree of harm.”

He also questioned the sincerity of her regret, and when at one point during her testimony she chuckled about her inability to remember the facts of the case, he asked her to explain her laughter.

“You did in effect, at one stage, admit wrongdoing,” Dorsey later told her. “But I don’t believe the level of sincerity is very great in your case.

“There may not be any at all.”


Do you have questions about embezzlement?  Give Prosperident a call at 888-398-2327 or send an email to requests@dentalembezzlement.com

Content retrieved from: Restitution agreed upon in dental assistant embezzlement case – Roanoke Times: Roanoke

Former VCU dental professor convicted of embezzling more than $100,000 — no jail time

hardigan

Update July 2018:

A retired Virginia Commonwealth University dental professor who embezzled more than $100,000 from the VCU Dental Faculty Practice Association will serve no jail time.

At a hearing Tuesday in Richmond Circuit Court, Judge Bradley B. Cavedo struggled in deciding what would be a fair punishment for James E. Hardigan. The defendant pleaded guilty in May to felony embezzlement of $137,553.

In the end, Cavedo gave Hardigan a 10-year suspended sentence and fined him $2,500. The judge noted that the 69-year-old defendant has paid restitution and cooperated with the authorities.

“I cannot put this man at his age in a correctional facility, given the facts of the case and the full restitution,” Cavedo said.

Hardigan apologized in court to his family and said he had acted with “abject stupidity.” After Cavedo announced his decision, the defendant hugged his wife in the courtroom.

“I think it was very, very fair,” Hardigan said in a brief interview. “I appreciate the judge’s decision.”

He could have faced up to 20 years in prison, but state sentencing guidelines had called for no active jail time.

He declined to comment on why he had taken the money.

Hardigan, who now lives in Florida, became a dental professor at VCU in 1975 and in 1980 was named associate dean for administrative affairs for the VCU Dental Faculty Practice Association, according to Richmond prosecutor John Jung.

The association was created to allow professors to both teach and have a private practice, Jung said.

In 1995, Hardigan opened an investment account with $500,000 under the association’s name, using money that belonged to the association, Jung said.

In 2004, Hardigan retired from VCU, Jung said. The following year, he moved $137,553 from the account that had been opened in the association’s name into a personal account, Jung said. But 63 cents of interest apparently accrued in the first account, Jung said.

Later, the investment firm asked the association about the account, and because the association had been unaware that the account existed, officials started looking into the matter, Jung said.

That led to an audit, which in turn led to a police investigation.

Hardigan’s attorney, Jeffrey L. Everhart, argued that his client has no criminal record and said that apart from the criminal case, he has led an “exemplary life.”

Everhart also told Cavedo that his client did not spend the $137,553 and that the money instead had “languished” in his account.

“He didn’t spend it,” Everhart said. “He returned it.”

Cavedo agreed with Everhart that, in many embezzlement cases, the money is spent and cannot be repaid.

Cavedo also took Hardigan’s age into consideration when deciding whether or not to give him active jail time. “He would be the oldest person I’ve ever locked up,” he said.

Rebecca Pousson, executive associate dean of the VCU School of Dentistry, testified for the prosecution that the theft has taken a financial and emotional toll on members of the dental school community, including those who had held Hardigan in high regard.

“They’ve suffered quite a bit,” she said.

Jung said it remains unclear what happened to the rest of the $500,000 that had been used to open the initial account.

Content retrieved from: https://www.richmond.com/news/local/crime/retired-vcu-dental-professor-gets-no-jail-time-for-stealing/article_d0fa6a50-2556-11e3-af6f-001a4bcf6878.html


A retired Virginia Commonwealth University dental professor almost got away with stealing more than $100,000 from the VCU Dental Faculty Practice Association, authorities said.

But James E. Hardigan was undone by a measly 63 cents that was left in an account from which he had taken a large sum of money, according to Richmond prosecutor John Jung.

Hardigan, 69, pleaded guilty Thursday in Richmond Circuit Court to felony embezzlement of $137,553.

No agreement was reached on his punishment. He faces up to 20 years in prison when he is sentenced Aug. 9.

Hardigan, who now lives in Florida, became a dental professor at VCU in 1975 and in 1980 was named associate dean for administrative affairs for the VCU Dental Faculty Practice Association, Jung said.

The association was created to allow professors to both teach and have a private practice, Jung said.

In 1995, Hardigan opened an investment account with $500,000 under the association’s name, using money that belonged to the association, Jung said.

In 2004, Hardigan retired from VCU, Jung said. The following year, he moved $137,553 from the account that had been opened in the association’s name into a personal account, Jung said.

But 63 cents of interest apparently accrued in the first account, Jung said.

Later, the investment firm asked the association about the account, and because the association had been unaware that the account existed, officials started looking into the matter, Jung said. That led to an audit, which in turn led to a police investigation.

Hardigan’s attorney, Jeffrey L. Everhart, said his client is prepared to pay back the amount that he was convicted of stealing. Hardigan apparently had kept the money in his account and not spent it, Everhart said.

“The money never went anywhere,” he said.

Jung said it is unclear what happened to the rest of the $500,000 that had been used to open the initial account.

Do you have questions about embezzlement?  Give Prosperident a call at 888-398-2327 or send an email to requests@dentalembezzlement.com

Content retrieved from: Former VCU dental professor convicted of embezzling more than $100,000 – Richmond Times-Dispatch: Latest News

_______________________

Sixty-three cents in interest left in an investment account reportedly incriminated a Venice retiree and former dental school professor who now faces up to 20 years in prison for felony embezzlement.

Authorities in Sarasota County arrested James Edward Hardigan, 69, of the 100 block of Torcello Court, on a warrant from Richmond, Va., in January.
Hardigan pleaded guilty in May and is scheduled back in Richmond Circuit Court on Sept. 24.

According to the Richmond Times-Dispatch, Hardigan became a professor at the School of Dentistry at Virginia Commonwealth University in 1975. In 1980, he became association dean for administrative affairs for the VCU Dental Faculty Practice Association.

In 1995, Hardigan reportedly opened an investment account under the faculty association’s name and with $500,000 of the association’s money.

Prosecutors claim that, when he retired in 2004, Hardigan moved $137,553 that remained in the association’s account to a personal account. They say 63 cents in interest later accrued in the association’s account. That eventually prompted the investment firm that still had the account to notify the association, which did not know the account existed.

An audit then turned into a police investigation, which led to Hardigan’s indictment by a grand jury in January.

Hardigan reportedly still had the $137,553 and agreed to pay it back.

Yet prosecutors told the Times-Dispatch that it is unclear what happened to the rest of the money that had been in the account.

According to Sarasota County property records, in 2004, Hardigan bought a newly constructed home in Venetian Golf & River Club for $639,000.

Content retrieved from: http://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20130811/63-cents-trips-up-confessed-embezzler-suspect


Retired VCU professor gets no jail time for embezzlement

RICHMOND, VA (WWBT) –

A retired VCU dental professor found guilty of stealing money will not face any jail time.

69-year-old James Hardigan was found guilty of stealing more than $130,000 from the VCU Dental Faculty Practice Association.

According to the Richmond Times Dispatch, a judge handed down a sentence of 10 years in jail, all of which was suspended. Hardigan must pay $2,500 in restitution.

Hardigan pled guilty in May to a single count of felony embezzlement.

Content retrieved from: http://www.wbrc.com/story/23533142/retired-vcu-professor-gets-no-jail-time-for-embezzlement